Preconception Care

Planning to start a family?
What you should know to ensure everyUntitled opportunity for natural fertility, an uncomplicated pregnancy and a healthy baby!
Preconception care
Preconception care is the ultimate in preventative medicine. Ideally both partners have the opportunity to assess and address any issues that may compromise fertility, as well as take the time to reduce any toxic exposure, achieve a healthy body composition and build nutritional credit to give every opportunity for fertility, an uncomplicated pregnancy and a healthy baby. Stress and nutrition are major environmental signals that influence both fertility and the developing foetus, making these important areas of focus to educate prospective parents in the preconception phase of growing their family.

Preconception care should ideally begin at least 4 months prior to the conception attempts. This preparation time is necessary as the ova take 3 months to mature and 2- 4 months for sperm to develop. Ensuring the health of sperm and ova by managing oxidative stress, reducing toxicity and providing nutritional support notably reduces the risk of miscarriage and supports a full term uncomplicated pregnancy.

Men are often overlooked in the preconception stages, but their contribution of half the genetic material is, of course, extremely important. Sperm production requires adequate nutritional levels and an absence of chemicals – since sperm are susceptible to oxidative damage from temperature, environmental and dietary toxins, toxins and radiation, so including both partners in a preconception care program is vital.

Factors that indicate Preconception Care for both partners

 Hormonal imbalances
 Increasing age
 Stress & fatigue
 Poor diet & nutrition
 Poor digestion
 Toxicity & chemical exposure
 Drugs – including caffeine, tobacco & alcohol
 Pollution
 Oxidative damage due to exposure to electromagnetic radiation (EMR)
 Genitourinary infections (e.g., Chlamydia and Mycoplasma)
 Immune dysregulation and/or inflammation
 Thyroid disorders
 Anaemia
 Sperm antibodies
 Cervical mucous quality and quantity
 Poor sperm motility
 Prostate infection
 Prostate fluid insufficiency
 Excessive or deficient exercise
 History of oral contraceptive use
 Medications
 Past pregnancy

For more information or to book an appointment with our Nutritionist Tarryn please contact the clinic on
03 8751 5271

POSTNATAL DEPRESSION


Postnatal depression affects 16% of woman in Australia. The symptoms occur after delivery and are the same as for a major depressive episode.

 

Did you know?

  • Serotonin is made from tryptophan (an amino acid)
  • Serotonin maintains a positive impact on mood
  • Nutritional deficiencies are common in post-pregnancy, this will impact on your ability to produce serotonin
  • Deficiency of serotonin leads to depression

 

Symptoms of postnatal depression:

  • loss of enjoyment in usual pursuits
  • loss of self-esteem and confidence
  • loss of appetite and weight
  • broken sleep (irrespective of baby)
  • sense of hopelessness and being a failure
  • a wish not to be alive
  • frank suicidal thoughts or ideas
  • panic attacks
  • loss of libido
  • fears for baby’s or partner’s safety or wellbeing.

 

Risk factors:

  • previous depression
  • a family history of mood disorders
  • previous and current stress
  • low social support
  • thyroid dysfunction
  • anaemia
  • post-partum fatigue
  • antepartum mood disturbance

 

What can help?

  • Make sure you’re resting when you’re tired
  • Let your partner and family know how you’re feeling
  • Try meditation
  • Mindfulness
  • Increase omega-3 in your diet such as; tuna, salmon, blue grenadier, sardines, walnuts and flaxseeds.
  • Limit intake of salt, solid fats and sugar
  • Join a Mother’s group

 

What treatment would suit you?

During a consultation Agata utilizes nutrition, herbal medicine, diet and lifestyle advice and flower essences. She works alongside counselors and psychologists to get the best outcomes for the individual and has developed her own 5 step mindfulness program that is yielding great results.

POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

POSTNATAL DEPRESSION

Postnatal depression affects 16% of woman in Australia. The symptoms occur after delivery and are the same as for a major depressive episode.

 

Symptoms of postnatal depression:

  • loss of enjoyment in usual pursuits
  • loss of self-esteem and confidence
  • loss of appetite and weight
  • broken sleep (irrespective of baby)
  • sense of hopelessness and being a failure
  • a wish not to be alive
  • frank suicidal thoughts or ideas
  • panic attacks
  • loss of libido
  • fears for baby’s or partner’s safety or wellbeing.

 

Risk factors:

  • previous depression
  • a family history of mood disorders
  • previous and current stress
  • low social support
  • thyroid dysfunction
  • anaemia
  • post-partum fatigue
  • antepartum mood disturbance

 

What can help?

  • Make sure you’re resting when you’re tired
  • Let your partner and family know how you’re feeling
  • Try meditation
  • Increase omega-3 in your diet such as; tuna, salmon, blue grenadier, sardines, walnuts and flaxseeds.
  • Limit intake of salt, solid fats and sugar
  • Join a Mother’s group

 

What treatment would suit you?

During a consultation Agata utilizes nutrition, herbal medicine, diet and lifestyle advice, flower essences and massage. She works alongside counselors and psychologists to get the best outcomes for the individual and has developed her own 5 step mindfulness program that is yielding great results.

Dry Skin Brushing

Dry brushing is a great way to stimulate the lymphatic system and assist in the removal of toxins. It also improves the function of your other eliminatory organs.

The major routes of elimination include the colon, kidneys, lungs, menses and the skin. The largest eliminative organ is your skin, which is also the overflow route for other channels of elimination if they dysfunction or are overloaded. Up to a third of all body impurities are excreted through the skin. Hundreds of thousands of tiny pores and sweat glands act to detoxify and excrete toxins and waste products.

Your body actually breathes through the skin, absorbing oxygen and exhaling carbon dioxide that is formed in tissues. If the pores become choked with dead cells and debris, the skin becomes inactive, the functions of the skin are ineffective and impurities remain in the body, which can then contribute to degenerative diseases. Moisturizers, deodorants and artificial fibres can actually make things worse.

What are the benefits of Dry Skin Brushing?

  • Effectively removes dead layers of skin and other impurities. Keeps pores open and functioning
  • Stimulates and increases blood circulation in all underlying organs and tissues, especially small blood capillaries
  • Revitalizes and increases the eliminative capacity of your skin and helps to throw toxins out of the system
  • Removes cellulite and tightens the skin thus preventing premature aging
  • Cleanses and strengthens the lymphatic system
  • Stimulates the hormone and oil producing glands; keeping your skin looking and feeling young, smooth and strong
  • Has a powerful rejuvenating influence on the nervous system by stimulating nerve ends in the skin
  • Helps prevent colds, especially when used in combination with hot-cold showers
  • Contributes to healthier muscle tone and better distribution of fat deposits, with continued use it breaks down cellulite

The brush itself:

Use a soft natural fiber brush with a long handle, so that you are able to reach all areas of your body. You can pick this up at any good health shop.

How do I do it?

  • Dry brush your dry and naked body before you shower or bathe so that you can wash off the impurities from the skin as a result from the brushing action
  • You can do the brushing head-to-toe or toe-to-head. It really doesn’t matter as long as the entire body is brushed. One method is to use long sweeping strokes that start in the torso and end at the hands or feet. Alternatively, you can brush towards the heart, starting with your feet and legs, then hands and arms, back, abdomen, chest and neck
  • Use as much pressure as you can comfortably stand. Initially you may want to start gently until your brush is seasoned, but work up to brushing until your skin is rosy, warm and glowing. Use light pressure in areas where skin is thin and harder pressures on places like the soles of the feet
  • Skin brushing should be performed once a day, preferably first thing in the morning. A thorough skin brushing takes about 10 to 15 minutes, but any time spent brushing prior to bathing will benefit the body. If you are feeling ill, increasing treatments to twice daily is good.

Some extra tips to get the most out of dry skin brushing:

  • Every two weeks or so – wash your dry skin brush with a natural soap. Dry your brush in the sun or a warm place. Washing the brush regularly will help to keep impurities from clogging it up
  • For hygienic reasons, use separate brushes for each member of the family
  • Avoid brushing any skin that is irritated, damaged or infected
  • The scalp can be brushed too. Scalp brushing will stimulate hair growth by increasing blood circulation and keep scalp clean from dandruff, stale oils, etc.
  • The facial skin of most people is too sensitive for brushing, avoid this delicate area, or use a specially designed facial brush with soft bristles